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Anneke Kurt
Anneke Kurt
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Wrongful death, personal injury to pedestrians increase with changing of clocks

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As we move the clocks back an hour as daylight savings time ends, personal injury and wrongful death are more likely to occur on the roads. According to CNN.com, pedestrians walking at dusk are three times more likely to be struck and suffer wrongful death in a car accident than before the clocks moved back. The highest personal injury and wrongful death risk for pedestrians occurs around 6pm during the month of November. This risk decreases each month until May, when the spring time change and longer days cause pedestrian deaths to drop dramatically. Reports show that it is not the actual dark that causes these pedestrian-car accidents, it is the drivers’ adjustments to the earlier darkness. Our Toledo, Ohio personal injury attorneys see the devastating effects of personal injury and wrongful death resulting from car accidents and encourage drivers to be careful on the roads, and walkers to be careful on the sidewalks, regardless of the time of year.

Obey all posted driving rules and speed limits, and keep an extra eye out for pedestrians. Since most pedestrian auto accidents occur at intersections, it is important not to speed through lights or make turns without looking – even if you have a green light or the right of way. Be extra careful during right turns on red and remember that pedestrians almost always have the right of way. When walking at or after dusk, make sure to carry a flashlight and have wear reflective gear so that you can be seen in the dark. Only cross at crosswalks, the walk light is green, and make sure to look right, left, and then right again for oncoming traffic. Never run across the street, and always hold the hand of any child crossing with you.

For more information on this subject, please refer to the section on Wrongful Death.